Remove this ad

Calibrating Lifeline Chest Expander Cables - An Experiment

Rss     Subscribe     Share     Tweet    


0 Points

#21 [url]

Jan 28 10 5:03 PM

I know Fatman

Despite me yesterday achieving a couple of PR's with springs,  when I pulled the two oranges out,  they still felt pretty much as hard at full stretch.   The most important measurements ( apart from the double-length Lifelines 32" ) were the full-span tensions and I paid a lot of attention to the measurements,  so there's only two things I can think of.

One I've already mentioned,  is the soft handle Lifeline grip biting into the base of my thumbs.   Apart from the discomfort,  I'm wondering if some energy lines in the hand are being blocked and sort of weakening the arms and shoulders.  I've done quite a bit of Chi Kung in the past and I can attest to sudden surges of otherwise unexplained strength which does not seem to be purely driven by muscle effort. I snapped the handle of my 5" good quality side-cutters on the job cutting through telephone cable in one "bite" with some six months Chi Kung training. No grip training. Some Chi Kung movements I performed became very powerful in their own right,  with the proper concentration.  Now I'm performing similar movements under tension and it could be the constriction on the hands that's making the two oranges seem so hard.  They seem easier until I'm about 2/3 through the movement and that's when the tension on the soft handles really comes in.

( I will write a post soon on the Chi Kung training and my opinion on its relevance to this strand-pulling forum. )

The other thing that has just come to me is that with all the full-stretch measurements,  the pause at full tension was very brief.  The scale took a few dummy go's to get the hang of and would 'beep' right after the expander ( springs or cable ) was held steady, much less than a second.  The measurements are otherwise reliable because I did a lot that I didn't write down or average out,  in order to make sure I was using the scale properly.
However,  when exercising and pulling out to full span,  I pause significantly longer than the scale took to make a measurement.  I'm wondering if the Lifeline rubber,  having been brought to a stop,  and for an instant,  actually sort of keeps going for a split second and self-increases in tension,  "settling in" and making my full stretch seem as hard as the springs.  Funny things happen with compounds like rubber, I am told,  and that would go with the "live feeling" that trainers report when they use cables.

At the last,  it could be a combination of the soft handles and the rubber "settling" into a slightly higher tension after a half second or so,  past the scale's measurement time.  Tomorrow I will do the FCP's and OHPD's with no pause and see if there is any difference in the perceived tension.  Then I will get back to you on it.  The problem may finally resolve itself when I obtain the triple grip handles.

This is of course purely speculation.  If I was able to obtain a spring scale,  which is really what I wanted,  all that would have been measurable.  Unfortunately I was only able to buy a digital scale,  which goes to show that the latest tech is not always the best, although it was prompt and precise with what I was able to use it for.

I certainly still have an open mind on your "sticking point" theory.   If you do end up buying some springs,  I wouldn't recommend the York,  because I think that the 20lbs springs like my Chinese set are more reliably measurable.  Hell, just hauling out three Yorks equals 90lbs+.  They don't leave enough room for feeling out the tension. Also,  at lower measurements,  they proved quite erratic so trying to "feel out sticking points" would probably be near impossible.   Do I make sense with any of this ?







Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad

#22 [url]

Jan 28 10 5:08 PM

I've got a couple of sets of this modern type, see photo. The springs on these are 27lbs each when compared to the same stretch as my Spenby's which are 20lbs. The 27lb springs offer a fair bit of resistance resistance very early into the stretch and sometimes make a movement impossible that I can do with the Spenby's with the equivalent resistance which all comes down to sticking points. Only thing I find with the 27lb springs is that they are easy to over stretch so I always use them combined with at least one Spenby spring. The Spenby springs have a length of string inside them which goes tight at full stretch and stops the spring stretching any further but it's just enough to allow a full stretch of the springs on any movement.

Paul.

Quote    Reply   

#23 [url]

Jan 28 10 6:30 PM

That's exactly the same handles I've got which I did the measurements on,  and use the Chinese springs with.  It's an older set I picked up 3-4 years ago,  but the York/NakedGym sets are exactly the same as well,  although grey not red/orange.  I've taped the handles on mine for grip.

Quote    Reply   

#24 [url]

Jan 28 10 8:52 PM

Yeah the handles definitely need taping. I've never got on with them myself, just because of their shape more than anything. Much prefer the feel old style wooden handles.

Paul.

Quote    Reply   

#25 [url]

Jan 29 10 4:55 AM

Fatman 2 wrote:

That is what really puzzles me too.

So the steel springs were measured to offer more resistance... but actually offered less (or just as much as the rubber cables, which registered a much lower pull on the scale).

Gotta be the sticking points.

What I would really like is to get my hands on some steel spring expanders and see what happens.


I have a set of  5 springs with wooden handles you can have for the price of shipping if you are interested. They are in good shape. Don't know the make of them.
  

Quote    Reply   

#26 [url]

Jan 29 10 5:10 AM

I don't know why I persisted with the red handle/Chinese springs combo but I've become used to them now for the heavier pulls.  The springs are stretched a little bit more with them than the wooden handles,  which are one inch longer each way than the reds.

They need taping because the plastic can get slippery with sweating.  I've used self-amalgamating rubber tape, but just about anything will be an improvement.

Nevertheless I use the wooden handles for Curls and the rotating grips are ideal for this.

I used the wooden handles for isometrics a few years back,  shackling chains onto them like Alexander Zass.
You can pick this up at the Sandowplus site.        Lotta fun.

Quote    Reply   

#27 [url]

Jan 29 10 6:20 AM

ayeedee wrote:
I have a set of  5 springs with wooden handles you can have for the price of shipping if you are interested. They are in good shape. Don't know the make of them.
  
That's very kind of you, thanks.

Might take you up on that offer if I can arrange a shipping address in the US where I can pick them up this summer, right now shipping from you to me would probably be more than what you paid for them originally

Quote    Reply   

#30 [url]

Jan 29 10 5:25 PM


Are you on the run, Fatman ?   :-)

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad

#33 [url]

Feb 6 10 1:46 PM

Resistance poundages of Lifeline cables

It's 6:45pm Saturday here in NZ.

An hour and a half ago I sent Lifeline another email requesting their comments on tests that I and Fatman conducted,  which proved conclusively that Lifelines Orange and Yellow cables were only approx. a third of their advertised poundages.

The email was not sent as a complaint,  but as an attempt to clarify the disparities between Lifeline's advertised cable pull-weights,  and what the cables actually are,  in reality. 

Given that NZ is approx. 20 hours ahead of the US, I don't expect an answer for a few days yet,  but I certainly will by the end of the week.

Another email three days ago ( using their form ) requesting a price for a set of R4 with triple-grip handles,  and a set of yellow cables, plus shipping,  is as yet also unanswered.

Last Edited By: BigBruvOfEngIandUK Jun 5 11 3:23 PM. Edited 1 time.

Quote    Reply   

#35 [url]

Feb 6 10 9:13 PM

Re: Resistance poundages of Lifeline cables

I think from what Brad said about his blue cables it can be concluded that they are only about a third of the actual poundage too. Only 32lbs as opposed to the 90lbs rating they are sold as. I presume it was a near double length stretch as it didn't say in the thread.


Paul.

Last Edited By: paul Feb 6 10 9:16 PM. Edited 2 times.

Quote    Reply   

#36 [url]

Feb 7 10 3:32 AM

Re: Resistance poundages of Lifeline cables

paul wrote:
I think from what Brad said about his blue cables it can be concluded that they are only about a third of the actual poundage too. Only 32lbs as opposed to the 90lbs rating they are sold as. I presume it was a near double length stretch as it didn't say in the thread.

Paul.
Yes, this may be another piece of evidence of Lifeline's apparently exaggerated advertising.
http://www.lifelineusa.com/en/products/chest-expander?q=products/chest-expander&detail&detail

  

Quote    Reply   

#37 [url]

Feb 8 10 12:35 AM

resistance rating

Are you testing one cable or three at a time. I was thinking that the poundage rating could be for three cables instead of one. As the Lifeline handles hold three cables. This would explain the 1/3 resistance.

Quote    Reply   

#38 [url]

Feb 8 10 2:04 AM

Re: Resistance poundages of Lifeline cables

kyodo wrote:
Are you testing one cable or three at a time. I was thinking that the poundage rating could be for three cables instead of one. As the Lifeline handles hold three cables. This would explain the 1/3 resistance.

The ratings are per cable. Taken from their website "Start with R3 cables (30, 60 or 90 pounds of resistance when using all 3)".

Paul.

Quote    Reply   

#39 [url]

Feb 8 10 3:06 AM

Re: Resistance poundages of Lifeline cables

kyodo wrote:
Are you testing one cable or three at a time. I was thinking that the poundage rating could be for three cables instead of one. As the Lifeline handles hold three cables. This would explain the 1/3 resistance.

 Yes we tested one cable at a time.  With my tests, I numbered each cable so I wouldn't get them mixed up, and tested them singley,  apart from three double-cable tests taken as a confirmation of my arithmetic calculations.
I too wondered if the given pull-weight poundage was for the three cables together,  and I certainly would not mind if they were. 
But Lifeline's site page clearly advertises the R3 as 30, 60, 90lbs and the R9 as 270lbs of "pure back and chest popping resistance". The following sentence mentions Matt Furey "teaching you everything you need to know about putting up to 270lbs of variable resistance to work for you". This is a clear inducement for any serious strandpuller who is interested in developing great strength,  I would have thought.

I'm sure that many Lifeline users would have taken these figures to mean that ( say ) Orange cables were 50lbs each,  not combined,  and have long measured their workout progressions based on what now seem to be completely erroneous and misleading figures.

I think that it is fair to ask Lifeline for an explanation,  given their standing in the exercise equipment market.
  

Quote    Reply   

#40 [url]

Feb 8 10 2:31 PM

Re: Resistance poundages of Lifeline cables

Where would one get latex tubing or bands that are accurately represented? I've been using Lifeline's purple and red tubing for years, and although I like it and find it challenging, I would prefer to know exactly how much poundage I'm pulling.

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help