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#21 [url]

Nov 7 12 1:32 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

olderguy wrote:
Right now I'm experimenting with whey protein. I saw some research where guys 60 - 80, if my memory serves me on the ages, took 40 grams of whey protein right after their workouts and got much better gains than the control groups. The whey protein users put on more lean muscle and lost body fat. The results of another research claimed whey protein boosted testosterone (That sounds a bit hard to believe for me, but if it's true so much the better).
Whether the protein comes from whey or some other animal product probably makes little if any difference. What were the control group doing?

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#22 [url]

Nov 7 12 2:18 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

The advantage of whey post workout is it's fast absorption, but it's by no means necessary, any good protein source will do. Adding carbs to the mix will give even better results.

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#23 [url]

Nov 7 12 2:46 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

This is a link to the results of one of the studies:

http://www.wellnessresour...s_muscle_in_elderly_men/

Advocates of using whey protein claim it's a better source:

"Whey protein, a high—quality protein found in dairy, has a high biological value compared with other protein sources, so it is easily absorbed and used by the body. Food and beverage manufacturers can leverage the quality and value of whey protein in their product innovations to reach the mature consumer."

http://newhope360.com/con...help-seniors-muscle-loss

And this from the Mayo Clinic:

"Whey protein is also a popular dietary supplement for improving muscle strength and body composition and for the prevention of heart disease, diabetes, and age-related bone loss."

http://www.mayoclinic.com...n/NS_patient-wheyprotein

This from another study among many at whey proten . com:

"Conclusion: This study suggests that whey protein combined with BCAA and glutamine leads to improved body composition (increase lean muscle mass) and resistance exercise performance. Whey protein supplementation may help decrease body fat."

http://www.wheyprotein.com/recentstudies.html

Again, it may also offer some health benefits:

"Derived from milk, whey protein contains highly digestible amino acids, says the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Whey protein appears to increase glutathione levels in the body as well. Glutathione is a crucial substance that causes antioxidant actions in your body to naturally fight free radicals, which cause damage to your body's cells. Glutathione also protects your body from toxins, preventing damage and improving excretion of the toxins. People with certain types of cancer, cataracts, diabetes and liver disease tend to have deficiencies of glutathione."

http://www.livestrong.com...r-seniors/#ixzz2BW4eu800

I'm not a salesman or an evangelist for this stuff. So far for me it seems to be working. I'll need more time to see what the long-term results are. I do know my forearms, which were hard to pump up at my age, are getting a better pump than ever, and I am making better muscle gains since taking whey (Could be a placebo effect though, hard to say). I also know most amateur younger and older bodybuilders supplement with whey. Like this guy in his mid seventies, who I've communicated with and he swears he takes no steroids:

http://www.maestromusclemarathon.blogspot.com/

However, he attributes some of his impressive muscle mass to muscle memory. When he was a young man he achieved an impressive physique through bodybuilding and was on the cover of a muscle mag in America, Strength and Health many years ago. He stopped lifting weights for decades and took them up again in his early seventies. I believe he also has superb genetics on his side. he uses creatine as well, though studies based on people over 60 benefiting from creatine have borne mixed results. Some suggest it's useless for people over 60. Others support it, and some older guys claim they get good results using it, like Clarence Bass of "Ripped" fame.

I haven't tried creatine and I'm reluctant to, so I cannot say from personal experience if it works. I also wonder if creatine would be harmful long term to older guys. I did hear after two years it may no longer be effective. The guys who stated that, the notorious but smart Hodge Twins on Youtube, may have reached their full genetic potential, and thus the creatine doesn't give them the results they got when they first took it. That's just conjecture on my part.

All of the aforementioned studies and info about whey protein may mean nothing, however. Whey Protein could be debunked in future studies, like eggs that have gone back and forth from being good guys to being bad guys in studies.

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#24 [url]

Nov 7 12 3:30 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

Dave Reslo wrote:
I used to hold the band in my teeth and stand on it with one foot and do a few neck raises, then switch to the other foot. I tried it for the front of the neck with the cables going round my back, but it was too awkward.

this looks good for the jaw muscles too

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#25 [url]

Nov 8 12 2:11 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

olderguy wrote:
This is a link to the results of one of the studies:

http://www.wellnessresour...s_muscle_in_elderly_men/

Advocates of using whey protein claim it's a better source:

"Whey protein, a high—quality protein found in dairy, has a high biological value compared with other protein sources, so it is easily absorbed and used by the body. Food and beverage manufacturers can leverage the quality and value of whey protein in their product innovations to reach the mature consumer."

http://newhope360.com/con...help-seniors-muscle-loss

And this from the Mayo Clinic:

"Whey protein is also a popular dietary supplement for improving muscle strength and body composition and for the prevention of heart disease, diabetes, and age-related bone loss."

http://www.mayoclinic.com...n/NS_patient-wheyprotein

This from another study among many at whey proten . com:

"Conclusion: This study suggests that whey protein combined with BCAA and glutamine leads to improved body composition (increase lean muscle mass) and resistance exercise performance. Whey protein supplementation may help decrease body fat."

http://www.wheyprotein.com/recentstudies.html

Again, it may also offer some health benefits:

"Derived from milk, whey protein contains highly digestible amino acids, says the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Whey protein appears to increase glutathione levels in the body as well. Glutathione is a crucial substance that causes antioxidant actions in your body to naturally fight free radicals, which cause damage to your body's cells. Glutathione also protects your body from toxins, preventing damage and improving excretion of the toxins. People with certain types of cancer, cataracts, diabetes and liver disease tend to have deficiencies of glutathione."

http://www.livestrong.com...r-seniors/#ixzz2BW4eu800

I'm not a salesman or an evangelist for this stuff. So far for me it seems to be working. I'll need more time to see what the long-term results are. I do know my forearms, which were hard to pump up at my age, are getting a better pump than ever, and I am making better muscle gains since taking whey (Could be a placebo effect though, hard to say). I also know most amateur younger and older bodybuilders supplement with whey. Like this guy in his mid seventies, who I've communicated with and he swears he takes no steroids:

http://www.maestromusclemarathon.blogspot.com/

However, he attributes some of his impressive muscle mass to muscle memory. When he was a young man he achieved an impressive physique through bodybuilding and was on the cover of a muscle mag in America, Strength and Health many years ago. He stopped lifting weights for decades and took them up again in his early seventies. I believe he also has superb genetics on his side. he uses creatine as well, though studies based on people over 60 benefiting from creatine have borne mixed results. Some suggest it's useless for people over 60. Others support it, and some older guys claim they get good results using it, like Clarence Bass of "Ripped" fame.

I haven't tried creatine and I'm reluctant to, so I cannot say from personal experience if it works. I also wonder if creatine would be harmful long term to older guys. I did hear after two years it may no longer be effective. The guys who stated that, the notorious but smart Hodge Twins on Youtube, may have reached their full genetic potential, and thus the creatine doesn't give them the results they got when they first took it. That's just conjecture on my part.

All of the aforementioned studies and info about whey protein may mean nothing, however. Whey Protein could be debunked in future studies, like eggs that have gone back and forth from being good guys to being bad guys in studies.
I can't read through all that lot! Laugh The first article didnt compare whey to anything. It just compared various dosages of whey. What is the difference if somebody was to eat some eggs or meat or fish or drink some milk instead of having whey? Does whey
 really make a noticeabe difference over those other very good sources of protein?

Last Edited By: BigBruvOfEngIandUK Nov 8 12 2:16 AM. Edited 1 time.

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#26 [url]

Nov 8 12 4:44 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

BigBruvOfEngIandUK wrote:
 
I can't read through all that lot! Laugh The first article didnt compare whey to anything. It just compared various dosages of whey. What is the difference if somebody was to eat some eggs or meat or fish or drink some milk instead of having whey? Does whey really make a noticeabe difference over those other very good sources of protein?
For me the advantage of whey protein supplements is that you get pretty much pure protein (i.e. without all the other nutrients in egg, fish, meat, etc), so you can fine-tune your protein intake without getting in too many calories. Otherwise there are no special advantages, I made my best gains without protein supplements (using actual food instead) and supplement with whey only to keep my weight in check.

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#27 [url]

Nov 8 12 6:19 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

kamp91 the return wrote:
Dave Reslo wrote:
I used to hold the band in my teeth and stand on it with one foot and do a few neck raises, then switch to the other foot. I tried it for the front of the neck with the cables going round my back, but it was too awkward.

this looks good for the jaw muscles too
Yeah, that's what I thought. At first it actually tired my jaw muscles more than my neck muscles, but after a few times my jaw got used to it and it became much moer of a neck exercise. The muscles in the jaw are at a tremendous mechanical advantage, even though I was wearing a gum shield on both rows of teeth and biting onto a quite slippery loop of fabric which passed throough the bands it quickly became easy to hold on. I used to just chew several packets of sugar free chewing gum at once, then I'd put them in a container until they went hard, give them a rinse and use them again the next day.
For my neck I used to do a headstand against a wall without any hands, I got up to four minutes or so, maybe Kamp can work up to an hour.
By the way, there's lots of entertaining videos on the British Pathe website:
http://www.britishpathe.com/search/query/teeth
www.britishpathe.com/video/the-grand-glide/
www.britishpathe.com/video/man-pulls-bus-with-teeth/
That second one also briefly features some spring expanders.

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#28 [url]

Nov 8 12 7:23 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

The Joe Bonomo "Black Beauty" chest expander course on the SandowPlus site shows a couple of neck excercises for use with a chest expander. I tried them today, but wasn't too impressed with them. It could be that my expander wasn't exactly right for them though.

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#29 [url]

Nov 8 12 12:43 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

"For my neck I used to do a headstand against a wall without any hands, I got up to four minutes or so, maybe Kamp can work up to an hour."

That must have blown up your neck. I'd probably kill myself if I tried those, lol.

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#30 [url]

Nov 8 12 12:44 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

"The Joe Bonomo "Black Beauty" chest expander course on the SandowPlus site shows a couple of neck excercises for use with a chest expander. I tried them today, but wasn't too impressed with them. It could be that my expander wasn't exactly right for them though."

I'll have to check those out. Thanks for posting that info.

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#31 [url]

Nov 8 12 1:04 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

"I can't read through all that lot! Laugh The first article didnt compare whey to anything. It just compared various dosages of whey. What is the difference if somebody was to eat some eggs or meat or fish or drink some milk instead of having whey? Does whey
 really make a noticeabe difference over those other very good sources of protein?"

I think eggs are real good. One old guy I saw in a video eat 3 a day and he seemed like he was benefiting. I've always felt eggs are one of the best sources of protein, and it feels like it when I eat them. I also feel the bad reputation they get from time to time is BS.

Whether they're better then whey I do not know, but you could check Whey Protein Facts to see if your questions are answered there. I do know I'm doing better after taking whey protein. That, or course, could be the placebo effect or it could be due to that maybe not being a red meat eater I wasn't getting enough protein and the extra boost in protein is what's making a difference, or what I've read in the studies about whey and seniors has merit. 

But, as I wrote before I'm not a salesman or an evangelist for it. I'm just experimenting and enjoying the results. I do believe, though, that whey would benefit people over 60 more than younger people just because ageing bodies might need the extra protein (just as some people feel older guys who work out need supplements for joint health) and the effects from whey protein might be more noticeable in older bodies. Maybe not.

I say maybe not because much of what is believed to be gospel truth can change with time, even with reams of research results supporting it, and you can talk to two experts on the same subject and get totally opposite answers. You see this in courts of law all the time, lol.   


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#32 [url]

Nov 8 12 1:50 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

olderguy wrote:
Whether they're better then whey I do not know, but you could check Whey Protein Facts to see if your questions are answered there. I do know I'm doing better after taking whey protein.
I dont really want to get my "facts" from sites that advertise the products they are discussing.
What were you doing before using whey to compare? This is the thing, so much of the information seems to compare whey with doing nothing or a small portion of whey against a larger portion of whey. How does whey compare to other foods?

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#33 [url]

Nov 8 12 2:17 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

Here's my thinking on this. Since I have no desire to promote or defend whey usage, and I'm not an expert on whey, and because I have given you what I felt were the best links to information about whey, one citing many studies, that were insufficient for your inquiries, I think you would be better served researching the pros and cons about it on the net and drawing your own conclusions.

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#34 [url]

Nov 8 12 2:59 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

Whey is one of the few 'supplements' that actually are legit. If you shop around you'll find whey to be a very economical protein source, just avoid the hyped up brands, or one's that contain other ingredients. As a protein source, whey has a very good profile of essential amino acids, and is about as perfect a source as you can find. Not to mention the less expensive 'concentrate' has lactoferrin which boosts the immune system.

The other thing that's pretty well established is the idea of getting more 'fast' carbs and protein in around the time of your workout.

I was the archetypical hardgainer, and this single change to my diet has yielded excellent results. Of course you can also do it without whey but it's very hard to beat the convenience of the stuff.

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#35 [url]

Nov 9 12 1:51 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

olderguy wrote:
"For my neck I used to do a headstand against a wall without any hands, I got up to four minutes or so, maybe Kamp can work up to an hour."

That must have blown up your neck. I'd probably kill myself if I tried those, lol.

i've never done any headstand since i find it a dangerous exercise...i've done static wrestler bridge up to 16 minutes and i still do the ''ironbar'':place your legs up to your mid-calves on a chair and your head,neck and traps on another one keeping your body straight...it's a great exercise for the neck if you put just your head on the chair while if you put also your shoulders it becomes more an exercise for the lower back and the hamstrings and a lot of other muscles of the back

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#36 [url]

Nov 9 12 2:32 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

olderguy wrote:
Here's my thinking on this. Since I have no desire to promote or defend whey usage, and I'm not an expert on whey, and because I have given you what I felt were the best links to information about whey, one citing many studies, that were insufficient for your inquiries, I think you would be better served researching the pros and cons about it on the net and drawing your own conclusions.
Im allergic to dairy products so I really dont want to spend a lot of time reading up on something that Im allergic to. I just wanted to know what you were using or if you were using anything before using whey and how it compared?

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#37 [url]

Nov 9 12 2:34 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

MrBrady wrote:
Whey is one of the few 'supplements' that actually are legit. If you shop around you'll find whey to be a very economical protein source, just avoid the hyped up brands, or one's that contain other ingredients. As a protein source, whey has a very good profile of essential amino acids, and is about as perfect a source as you can find. Not to mention the less expensive 'concentrate' has lactoferrin which boosts the immune system.

The other thing that's pretty well established is the idea of getting more 'fast' carbs and protein in around the time of your workout.

I was the archetypical hardgainer, and this single change to my diet has yielded excellent results. Of course you can also do it without whey but it's very hard to beat the convenience of the stuff.
Same question to you. What were you having before you started with whey or were you not having anything?

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#38 [url]

Nov 9 12 2:54 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

Im allergic to dairy products so I really dont want to spend a lot of time reading up on something that Im allergic to. I just wanted to know what you were using or if you were using anything before using whey and how it compared?


Okay. My apologies for misunderstanding you. I used nothing before whey. I only got intrigued by it after I stumbled upon it when I was researching creatine on the net. I believe more protein is helpful. Some believe it's unnecessary.

I think soy and egg protein could be an option. You may know taking protein within an hour after a workout is said to help muscle recovery and growth.

If I were unable to use whey, I believe I would use egg protein. I've always felt stronger after eating eggs and sensed eggs were a powerful protein.    

I saw a health program on TV where a doctor from Australia ate 3 eggs a day for 6 months to see  if the eggs raised his cholesterol (or perhaps more correctly, bad cholesterol?).

A bodybuilder who ate 12 eggs a day was also studied for 6 mohths to see how his cholesterol was affected.

Both had low cholesterol after the 6 months. The doctor concluded eggs were not harmful and actually lowered cholesterol. So, based on that and other things I've read about eggs, I'd trust eggs and would use them if I could not take whey. And, as I wrote before, I saw a 70 something year old guy who worked out and ate 3 eggs a day for many years.       
 

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#39 [url]

Nov 9 12 2:58 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

i've done static wrestler bridge up to 16 minutes and i still do the ''ironbar'':place your legs up to your mid-calves on a chair and your head,neck and traps on another one keeping your body straight
That sounds like a kung fu exercise. Where did you learn about that? I can see how it would be effective and, I think, far less risky than neck bridges.

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#40 [url]

Nov 9 12 3:14 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

I was the archetypical hardgainer, and this single change to my diet has yielded excellent results. Of course you can also do it without whey but it's very hard to beat the convenience of the stuff.
MrBrady, did it help you with muscles that are more stubborn to build than others? For example, for me the calves, forearms (done a lot of work on my forearms with little success) and neck have always been difficult to pack muscle on. If you have muscles that were more difficult to build up than others, did the whey help those muscles too?

One thing I noticed after taking whey for about a week, I got a much better pump in my forearms. Prior to that I had told a friend of mine in the states that at my age I no longer got a noticeable pump in my forearms. After the whey I saw a big difference in the pump; it was almost like being 17 again the way my forearms pumped up and the veins bulged. I don't know if that's going to translate into my forearms miraculously getting more muscular, but I'm encouraged.

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