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Mar 2 09 3:28 PM

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Hi,

Yesterday I read through again Fatman's cable training guide and realized that I may be doing the exercise neck press out in a different way than it is described.

I start with kncukles inwards, strand touching the back of my neck, only when the strands extended to arm's length and then pressed forward I tilt my back against the resistance. But now as I read it again I realized that I'm not supposed to move my head, is that correct? If that is, this exercise would function as an isometric exercise.

Thanks,
Gery

Last Edited By: BigBruvOfEngIandUK Nov 10 12 4:58 PM. Edited 1 time

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#2 [url]

Mar 3 09 12:06 AM

OK, no problem, I just wanted to clarify this... maybe my english is too bad to understand that

Anyway it is clear now.

Does anyone do special neck training with expanders? Neck press out seems to hit pretty good the neck muscles however, the side and front of the neck doesn't receive that much tax.

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#4 [url]

Jun 7 09 8:36 PM

Hi Brad,

I just re-read you article about your dad and his training methods. It's always a good read and in the picture where your father makes a side chest pose in his A-shirt is just astoniosihing, his remarkable neck-traps, chest and especially shoulder development is unhuman J Do you know how your father might have trained his neck-traps area? Wrestlers' bridge or some other special exercises with expanders?

Thanks,
Gery

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#5 [url]

Jun 8 09 9:55 PM

Gery,

I have this old page of photos of my father from his college album... it is one of those photos sort of taken where the photographer has one sitting with a shoulder pointed to the camera (right angle to the camera), then the face is turned to look at the camera. His neck was nearly the size of his head and he looks almost funny compared to the other men classmates pictured on the page with normal neck dimensions.

A couple of things... he was the boxing and wrestling coach while in college, so he got neck work from the wrestling. This was after his polio affliction, so his boxing days were over, and he wrestled in what were called "smokers" then. Club wrestling.

I think the largest his neck ever measured was years later in the 1960s when he was closer to 240 lbs. and I know it was over 20", 20.5" seems to ring a bell.

The best rear neck exercise is just to take a neck harness and hook and then dangle a set of cables from it using a carabiner. The cable set is now hanging down toward your midsection in front of the body. Grab the dangling strands at about "elbows at right angles" then press the hands downward (as if doing a tricep press down) to develop the right resistance pulling your head down and forward, then pull your head up and back against the strand resistance. Adjust the resistance by adjusting how much you pull down on the cable set strands.

Work the front neck muscles by attaching the cable set to the ring at the back of your neck harness, then dangle it behind the back, grab the strands with your hands behind your back, develop the resistance you seek, pull your head back, then pull it forward so that your chin touches your chest.

Neck work is slightly higher rep work... 3 sets of 12 to 20 reps is ALL that you need for front and back. Any more than that and you can overdevelop the muscles.

Finally, for the showy side neck muscles, to give them a bit more attention, my father always exercised them manually by pressing the palm of his hand against the side of his head and then rocking his head into resistance from the hand. You could do the same thing with a strand set arrangement of course.

Wait until you see the "before" and "after" effects of this workout. Nothing pumps up more than neck muscles.

Cheers! Brad

Do the reverse for the back nec

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#7 [url]

Jun 9 09 9:33 PM

Gery, the old Noe Ads listed him at 6' 1" and the different versions printed over a few years updated his weight gains, the first stating 199 lbs. then another at 205 lbs. I think his heaviest really defined weight was 215 lbs. in 1945, at age 26 to 27. Then, like most of us he got thicker with age though he never developed a large waistline. In and around 1960, he was 240 lbs. and had his largest muscular measurements.

Brad

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#8 [url]

Nov 6 12 12:58 PM

Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

Right or wrong, I believe it's important to exercise the neck, and believe working it confers health benefits beyond making it stronger, maybe a little protection against strokes. I could easily be mistaken.

Back in the seventies, I read about a bodybuilder who got into a serious motorcycle accident that landed him in the hospital. The doctor who treated him told the bodybuilder his strong neck muscles saved him from more serious complications (Not sure if he was referring to paralysis). Many years after that, I met a guy whose son, who also did neck work, had a similar accident and the strong neck muscles were said to have saved him from more serious complications too.

After I read about the first case and heard about the second one, I became a big believer in doing some neck work. For, what I see as genetic reasons, I never got the huge wrestler's neck, or any visible indications that I do neck work. But I got a stronger, slightly larger neck than I would have had without exercising it. I believe I got a better chance to survive a strong blow to the head or some other accident involving the neck, and I think some additional benefits from the extra blood I pump into the neck along with the strengthening of it.

So, I'm wondering if anyone knows if the neck can be "safely" worked with resistance bands. The idea of using bands for this conjures up a risky sling shot effect in my mind. On the other hand, maybe resistance bands could be more effective than weights or other devices for neck work. Anyone know, or do neck work with resistance bands? 
     

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#9 [url]

Nov 6 12 1:20 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

lol, at my resistane mistake in the title. I couldn't find a way to edit it after I made the post and saw the mistake.

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#10 [url]

Nov 6 12 9:04 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

i don't think bands are very useful as far as neck training

the safest way to train the neck is with some isometrics pushing one hand for 6-12 seconds against the part of the neck that you want to train

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#11 [url]

Nov 6 12 10:53 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

Isometrics are pretty good for neck training. I've done everything from abbreviated neck bridges against a wall to using a neck harness to isometric neck training using my hands on the front, back and sides of my head and isometrics with my neck pushing against a wall to neck lifts with weight plates on my forehead while lying on a bench. The weighted neck lifts have been the best for me, so far., and I've done them for years. switching from low reps to high reps. But, I'm always looking at new ways to work the neck.

I've seen a 4 way machine that you press your head against in 4 different directions, nautilus used to make one too, that looks quite good and safe, but I've never tried that and don't want to pay the high cost of a good one for home use. The full wrestlers bridges looks good as well, but too risky for me at my age and easy to hurt yourself with if you screw up. Yet, many guys get good results with them and they appear to be a staple for serious neck work.

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#12 [url]

Nov 7 12 1:57 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

I used to hold the band in my teeth and stand on it with one foot and do a few neck raises, then switch to the other foot. I tried it for the front of the neck with the cables going round my back, but it was too awkward.

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#13 [url]

Nov 7 12 3:13 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

@Dave Reslo That was a damn good try. Too bad it was awkward. No doubt you could have gotten some good neck strength and size out of it.

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#14 [url]

Nov 7 12 4:23 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

I think that you would want to use the flat, 'Theraband' style bands for this. There is no reason it wouldn't work, you could just hold the band in your hands as a lost resort.

I've actually been meaning to try this, but just haven't found time to fit it in yet. Will give it a go next session.

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#15 [url]

Nov 7 12 5:11 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

MrBrady wrote:
I think that you would want to use the flat, 'Theraband' style bands for this. There is no reason it wouldn't work, you could just hold the band in your hands as a lost resort.
Or even a last resort

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#16 [url]

Nov 7 12 7:01 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

Using your hands to supply resistance to the neck is certainly a safe way to train. However, hand resistance is insufficient for even intermediate trainees;use a towel or wide webbing strap for leverage so that max resistance can be applied .

Sweat for salvation

Even Darwin can appreciate the HOOK's Intelligent Design 

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#17 [url]

Nov 7 12 11:47 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

@MrBrady The flat Theraband style sounds like a workable idea. I have been thinking maybe the smooth motion of a machine could be replicated with bands, kind of like how bowflex seems to, and I was wondering if the smooth constant tension would boost muscle growth a little more in the neck. Maybe it would make no difference, but it would be an interesting experiment. And speaking of experiments, this is one of the things I like best about working out. For me, a work out room is like a lab where you get to experiment with various methods and see the results in your development.

Right now I'm experimenting with whey protein. I saw some research where guys 60 - 80, if my memory serves me on the ages, took 40 grams of whey protein right after their workouts and got much better gains than the control groups. The whey protein users put on more lean muscle and lost body fat. The results of another research claimed whey protein boosted testosterone (That sounds a bit hard to believe for me, but if it's true so much the better).

I've been doing the 40 grams after workouts three months, and taking 20 grams on non-workout days. My gains feel like they were when I was a young guy. I'm also getting a better pump in my exercises. Of course, all that may be a placebo effect, but for whatever reasons it appears to be working. My wife even said my neck looked larger, which is like a religious miracle because for me the neck is an extremely stubborn area to build up, and unlike her I don't see a noticeable change. I'm still looking for the elusive wrestler's neck, lol.

Some say you don't need protein supplements, and they may be right. An example they give is "look at those bulked up guys in prisons who don't have access to special diets yet get hugely muscled." Of course, those bulked up guys may have contraband steroids to help their muscles along. Maybe not.

I don't know who is right on that argument, but I believe as a guy ages a little extra protein goes a long way particularly if he doesn't eat red meat much. I could be mistaken on that, and maybe none of the nutrition experts have the definitive answer at this time.

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#18 [url]

Nov 7 12 11:59 AM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

A good neck exercise I use sometimes is to stretch a cable behind the neck in a back press position, only with the cables against the neck. Then press the head back against the cable resistance. You can get a nice burn in the neck muscles from doing this.

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#19 [url]

Nov 7 12 12:00 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

"Using your hands to supply resistance to the neck is certainly a safe way to train. However, hand resistance is insufficient for even intermediate trainees;use a towel or wide webbing strap for leverage so that max resistance can be applied."

This has been my experience with hand resistance, gruntbrain. It didn’t feel as productive to me as other methods. I never tried using a towel, which sounds like an interesting, workable approach. I'm going to research it and see what I can find.

It sounds like you exercise your neck. Maybe, like me, you enjoy it. When I work my neck, it gives me a powerful, almost euphoric, feeling. The power is no doubt illusionary in my case, but it feels great strengthening that vulnerable part of the anatomy.

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#20 [url]

Nov 7 12 12:02 PM

Re: Anybody know if resistane bands can be used to "safely" do neck exercises with?

"A good neck exercise I use sometimes is to stretch a cable behind the neck in a back press position, only with the cables against the neck. Then press the head back against the cable resistance. You can get a nice burn in the neck muscles from doing this."

That, Fatman2, sounds awesome, and safe, and no telling how much additional resistance you could apply to the neck using that method. When I get my bands I will try it.

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