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Dec 15 15 6:33 PM

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After trying of some workout routines with chest expander, I will stick with 9 or 10 excercises - 3 sets each / or 8 excercises - 4 sets each (with additional 3 set excercise maybe) - depending on mood.

I will do push ups and squats as only non-expander excercises (first also for core muscles) - other work will be only expander excercises: I´m not sure about squats daily - I don´t like them, but they are great as one excercise that targets all leg muscles and also lover back and I want to train legs for better mobility in the future = I do them only for I don´t want to be unmobile when I will be older .

Questions:

1) Do You think that You need to do squatting for reaching that goal (be mobile as You get older) or chest expander Leg press and another expander leg excercises will be enought to engage all leg muscles (and will be better for joints and knees?)"

2) Or simply - can You go without all bodyweight excercises and do only expander work and be perfectly mobile as You get older?

3) Is there any significant difference between targeting of muscles by push ups and by back press? I think that back press target more shoulders and do less ab work and push ups reverse, is that right? Maybe push ups do more work to chest and back press for triceps?

4) Wrist and forearms - are for great forearms and wrist development enough main chest expander excercises (as reverse biceps curl, ODP and so on..) - if so, which excercise of them is best? Or is better to work out them in additional excercises (like wrist curls and reverse wrist curls)?

5) Posture - what excercise do You considered best for correcting desk job posture: Rows / ODP / another?

6) What is main difference between Front press and Back press mucle activation? (Is front press targeting chest muscles more?). Are Front press and Lateral raises necessary excercises, if Back press targets shoulders with similar motion?

7) Which main chest expander excercise from main expander excercises You concider as most overrated and why? Which as most underrated one and why?


Thank You.

Last Edited By: Lemmy01 Dec 15 15 7:01 PM. Edited 6 times

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#1 [url]

Dec 15 15 10:02 PM

1. Chest expander leg exercises are good, but they are severely limited in the amount of resistance you can use. Squats work better. Lunges work even better. When it comes to bodyweight leg exercises, try to progress to harder variations (e.g. squat to lunge to one-legged squat) rather than do tons of reps.


2. They are plenty of old people who are mobile and have never done any exercise, except maybe walking. You could forgo all bodyweight exercise and only do chest expander work... but why would you want to limit yourself that way?

3. There is a significant difference IMO. Pushups target the chest more, and train the abs isometrically. The back press engages the muscles of the upper back more than pushups do. I find the back press better for triceps.

4. You can add a couple of sets of reverse curls with a wrist curl on top to your workout to make sure you hit the forearm muscles effectively.

5. Most people think desk posture is about the upper back, but it's actually far more damaging to the hips and hamstrings (shortening and atrophy). The front pull will take care of the upper back (rows are good too), but make sure you include plenty of stretching and strengthening work for the lower body.

6. I feel the front press more in the triceps than the back press, and neither seem to target the chest very well. Do the front press as a variation (e.g. back press one workout, front press next workout). Lateral raises are a good isolation exercise.

7. No exercise is overrated or underrated, but I consider the back press shrug (where you stretch the cables in a back press, then move them by shrugging your scapulae) a good exercise that is often overlooked.

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#2 [url]

Dec 16 15 2:07 AM

Fatman 2 wrote:
1. Chest expander leg exercises are good, but they are severely limited in the amount of resistance you can use. Squats work better. Lunges work even better. When it comes to bodyweight leg exercises, try to progress to harder variations (e.g. squat to lunge to one-legged squat) rather than do tons of reps.

2. They are plenty of old people who are mobile and have never done any exercise, except maybe walking. You could forgo all bodyweight exercise and only do chest expander work... but why would you want to limit yourself that way?

 


Thanks for opinions.

Add to quote:
1. Yes, I know (weighted barbell squats and deadlift are greatest for muscular development and strength of legs ... for bodyweight variations are pistol/weighted pistol squats best). Bodyweight squats are maybe better bang-of-buck excercise than for example expander Leg press, but that doesn´t mean I can´t work out leg muscles with same results for health purpose with expanders too, am I right?
Or are expander excercises from Your experiences really that inferior for leg mobility/health and squats are always better way?

2. I work out at morning few minutes I get up from bed (only time I can work out) - and I really don´t like (= hate ) squatting in morning ("poping" in knees, out of breath after squats, etc.). With expander leg work I perform excercise in seated/lying/standing position, I control my breath better and it seems that my knee joints are in less strain that way. A like that excercises at morning too (unlike morning squats).

My point is: could be squats it that morning workouts conversely dangerous for health of kee joints and leg expander excercises will be for health and mobility goal better here?

I mean - I know that lot of old athletes that go by heavy squats (which is concidered as best type of workout for leg development and with some best workout for health of leg muscles and leg joints) - for example weightlifters and powerlifters ... have huge mobility and health issues with knees.

Last Edited By: Lemmy01 Dec 16 15 2:20 AM. Edited 1 time.

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#3 [url]

Dec 16 15 2:50 AM

In my opinion, chest expander exercises are inferior to squats for leg development.


With chest expander leg exercises, the resistance is limited by the strength of your arms (usually you have to hold one handle in your hands and press the other handle out with your feet). Since your legs are far stronger than your arms, the resistance you can use will probably not be enough to give your legs a decent workout. In addition to this, the resistance when your leg is flexed (i.e. when the cable is not stretched) is very low or zero, so you are not working this range of motion at all.

Yes, people who do heavy squats and deadlifts often experience mobility and health issues with knees, hips and spine in old age. But then again, people who never squat or deadlift also have issues with those same areas as they age. I believe that squatting with your own bodyweight (no external loading) is pretty safe.

But if you hate squats and like chest expander leg presses, or if you have a medical condition aggravated by squats, then you should do chest expander leg presses.

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#4 [url]

Dec 16 15 10:31 AM

Fatman 2 wrote:
With chest expander leg exercises, the resistance is limited by the strength of your arms (usually you have to hold one handle in your hands and press the other handle out with your feet). Since your legs are far stronger than your arms, the resistance you can use will probably not be enough to give your legs a decent workout. In addition to this, the resistance when your leg is flexed (i.e. when the cable is not stretched) is very low or zero, so you are not working this range of motion at all.

True points... Resistance is limited by strength of arms - that´s big disadvantage for leg workout results with expander. But could be advantage for activation of arms (for example lying leg press will be also benefical for biceps and core will be slightly worked too). I think it depends also on excercise, length of tubes (which way You hold expander).

Flexed resistance - that disadvantage is common for most expander excercises. In my opinion that´s the greatest disadvantage that expanders have compared with weighted workout. But at the other hand - peak of motion is strongest with expanders than with weights (resistance increase by motion to peak of stretch) - I think this advantage apply for leg workout with expanders too.
But ... that´s covered in Your book already


I know genetics and lifestyle (movement, diet, etc..) is huge part of mobility issues in old age, but question is if weighted leg workout and some another leg excercises (jump, etc...) could extend that possibillity of issues (and lead to injury more that expander leg workout). It depends, and it´s pure theory... who knows


But for second time - thanks for opinions. 

I would do expander leg excercises and see what will be results. If I feel to do squats, I will do them too.

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#5 [url]

Dec 16 15 12:28 PM

Lemmy,


Check out my pics in the discussion about strand deadlifts for a spring squat set-up.  I use the diamond plate platform for squats and calf raises more than deadlifts. I anchored my springs in the rafters of my garage which provides a fantastic flex and range of motion. I also perform other spring tension leg exercises, leg curl and leg extension, on a modified bowflex.  Another group using springs for leg development are pilates enthusiasts, mainly professional dancers.  Joe Pilates initially developed the Gratz reformer for men and those springs are about twice the diameter of a typical chest expander.  I have a pair and they are a blast to pump muscles with.  But the Gratz reformer is a ridiculously expensive piece of equipment.   I personally prefer the feel of steel over rubber.  But I am not spending $5000 US on a Gratz.  Plus, I am in agreement with idea that athletes train on their feet, not backs.  I previously had a vertical leg press with spring tension but discarded it because I did not care for the pressure it put on my lower back.  Now, whether you prefer rubber over steel, you will not be moving as much weight as "conventional" iron lifters in the gym.  But fear not, you can still develop respectable muscles with less weight. Check out what Kai Green has to say on bodybuilding vs weightlifting in this youtube video:

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#6 [url]

Dec 16 15 1:55 PM

yankeebandit:

Thanks, I saw that post and pictures (long time lurker of this forum). I wish I could have space and resources for some of these spring set-ups. Spring expanders have unique "old-time" feel - I concider them as very cool piece of equipment. After time, I wish to spend little cash (on our´s country version of craiglist) to expand my home expander equip (spring expander is for example one thing I don´t really need for workout, but really want to have as some sort of "fetish fitness" equipment ).
I don´t have experience with springs but as far as I know they don´t "wore-out" as rubber (talking about standard quality spring and rubber). At the other hand - if they crack, they can damage You more and they are also "louder", than rubber, which is quiet piece of equipment: main reason I use rubber than spring is that I work out at home and have fear that if a stretch springs, they will wake up my family.

I can´t do proper weighted squat (neck spine problems), but I have experience with them (as with deadlift - few years ago I had worked out as powerlifter at gym - lots of "heavy" squats, deadlift, benches). Only option to do weighted standing leg work for my is kettlebells or dumbbells (I have also experience with them).
Another option is bodyweight squats/lunges, etc...:
But - as I wrote: I don´t know if that type of morning leg workout after I woke up (as I wrote - for my only possible time to work out: I woke up, go early to work so I can early end and enjoy time with my family - little kids - at afternoon more) will not be counter-productive (if morning squat with no long stretching/moving legs before that excercise will not lead conversely to knee problems).
Another reason I don´t work out with weights is back health. I know morning spine loading (= meaning weighted back workout) is not healthy (especially for spine and lover back) and I find expanders really great to solve this back-workout-loading-at-morning problem (also with bridging and some neck stretches for my neck spine issues) + expander is only equip (outside pull-up bar, lat pulldown) that provide possibillity of vertical pull (ODP excercise) - which is also great for scapula and shoulder health I think (weights don´t provide possibillity of that type of vertical pulling excercise). I think that expanders are better for spine correction that weights (which put some stress for nervous system and spine) too.
But I agree that weights are better if goal is primarly muscular development overall (with no health concideration).

Least but not last reason I use expander is prize. Frugal person here (must be one - mortgage, kids, not so great payment from job, etc...). Expander is cheaper than any other bodybuilding euipment. One set provide me possibillity of all type of excercises and motions.
So from that reasons I posted question about expanders and leg workout (if they can cover my goals completely outside bodyweight training and if they will be maybe more healthy for morning workouts than squat bending of knees).


Jack Reid and Fred Crivello are huge motivation persons for me that show how far I can go with expander workout with results. But I know Fred also do another type of working out his muscles (jiu-jitsu, grappling) and Jack also had (I think he did lot of bodyweight stuff - surely know from some courses he could do hand stand push ups for lot of reps - so I think he work them reguralry, not only as a feat he can do sporadicaly).
I know Fred Rollon do mainly expander type of workouts (but as Fatman wrote is his book - no oldtime strongman worked out only with one type of equipment). Alfted Danks also did proper squating motions.
So far I don´t find athlete that did only expander excercises with legs (I think maybe Fred could be closest to that - at least as from information I know about him from this forum).


As I wrote - I give it a try (only expander work) and see how far I can go (if I feel that my leg joints feel better after expander work than after bodyweight squats)

EDIT: Some grammar and language edits.
Also sorry for my bad english and length of posts.

Last Edited By: Lemmy01 Dec 16 15 2:09 PM. Edited 4 times.

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#7 [url]

Dec 25 15 9:20 AM

Replies

Lemmy01 wrote:


After trying of some workout routines with chest expander, I will stick with 9 or 10 excercises - 3 sets each / or 8 excercises - 4 sets each (with additional 3 set excercise maybe) - depending on mood.

I will do push ups and squats as only non-expander excercises (first also for core muscles) - other work will be only expander excercises: I´m not sure about squats daily - I don´t like them, but they are great as one excercise that targets all leg muscles and also lover back and I want to train legs for better mobility in the future = I do them only for I don´t want to be unmobile when I will be older happy.gif.

Questions:

1) Do You think that You need to do squatting for reaching that goal (be mobile as You get older) or chest expander Leg press and another expander leg excercises will be enought to engage all leg muscles (and will be better for joints and knees?)"


If you mean with weights, likely not. But, if you intend to maintain your full range and the ability to squat really low and "sit on your haunches," then you need to at least get into that low position often. If you don't use a range, you will lose it. But, I'd say really that one thing I would do differently if I could have a "do over" is I'd likely only squat heavy down to about parallel, maybe even a bit higher. It is rare that in any sport the knee flexion actually exceeds this angle.

2) Or simply - can You go without all bodyweight excercises and do only expander work and be perfectly mobile as You get older?

You bet! Some combination of chins, dips, free squats, then toss in some expander work, is really productive. But, you won't win any weightlifting meets or bodybuilding contests. But, this is a very healthful approach.

3) Is there any significant difference between targeting of muscles by push ups and by back press? I think that back press target more shoulders and do less ab work and push ups reverse, is that right? Maybe push ups do more work to chest and back press for triceps?

You have it about right. But, the back press is unique in that it exercises the muscles in a manner not achievable with weights and most other motions. And, it involves really large muscles. I'd do some of both. Remember: Plenty of people have overdeveloped their pectorals; no one has ever over-developed their deltoids.

4) Wrist and forearms - are for great forearms and wrist development enough main chest expander excercises (as reverse biceps curl, ODP and so on..) - if so, which excercise of them is best? Or is better to work out them in additional excercises (like wrist curls and reverse wrist curls)?

After your chins, do some hanging by one hand for grip strength. The best forearm exercises are reverse curls for the top area, wrist rolls rolling downward for the large girth area.

5) Posture - what excercise do You considered best for correcting desk job posture: Rows / ODP / another?

Neck work with a head strap fastened to a long expander to a door anchor. Front pulls with expanders.

6) What is main difference between Front press and Back press mucle activation? (Is front press targeting chest muscles more?). Are Front press and Lateral raises necessary excercises, if Back press targets shoulders with similar motion?

Front Press puts slightly more pressure on the outside edge of the deltoids. And, the hands are in an inferior position as are the elbows. The Back Press is more like a dumbbell side press.  There are several versions of each of these exercises. Use them all.

7) Which main chest expander excercise from main expander excercises You concider as most overrated and why? Which as most underrated one and why?

They are all good. I think the one that is sort of esoteric and likely has the least range of application to the most people would be the Archer's Pull. But, it is still a great exercise.


Thank You.

Well, thank you!      Brad Reid



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#8 [url]

Dec 26 15 12:16 AM

So... last week I did some workouts and realized You was absolutely right, guys (one reason I start to participate in this forum is Your´s knowledge, that´s very helpful). After only expander workouts, when I did also two excercises for legs, I had after that in job hours worst feel in knees (need to do more stretching of legs that days), than I had after another workout, when I combine bodyweight and expander work (for legs I did squats and calf raises). After "cracking" sounds and "funny" feel within first set of squats, another sets were ok.

I think for the long run squats (and some walking) will work better for health of my legs, than expander work (I don´t think that I will go after my previous goal: only expander work, see how far I can go with it).
I know expander work for legs in morning will be maybe easier

Thanks for antother replyes to You all.
I will do all excercises I ask about their´s difference - with info from replies It seems all have their´s place despite the fact, some "attack" the same muscle groups.

In current time I´m thinking to ad more bodyweight excercises approach to my workouts at future (need to figure out how to deal with missing place where I can do pull/chin ups and bodyweight rows - one reason I use expander is I can dub this motions with it) and maybe create/buy some another equip (kettlebell maybe) for better lover back/leg work and conditioning.

Brad:
In this topic I mentioned Your father Jack as inspiration for my expander workouts. I wrote that I think he did surely bodyweight excercises also, was I right? Could You please send me some more informations about this (which excercises outside expanders he did, how often)?
Did he also use another fitness equipment outside strands?
(From fotos I found online it seems he had really well developed lats and biceps, I was wonder if that could be only from expander work or if he did chin ups/pull ups also).

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#9 [url]

Dec 26 15 9:51 AM

other exercises

As I have posted before, he did a lot of chinning and dipping early on, some ring work, too. When his 2 arm chins became sort of like a breathing exercise for him and didn't provide enough resistance, he chinned with Uncle Harry, his younger brother, hanging on, then he progressed to one arm chinning.

And, he did a lot of handstand pressing.

These are basic exercises that would still work today.

Brad


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#10 [url]

Dec 26 15 12:17 PM

Thanks.
So lot of his physique could be concidered as builded by bodyweight fitness (not only expanders ... that´s in some way surprise for me - I supposed from arcicles he did mainly expander workouts and bodyweight stuff like handstands did only as a supplement thing - but from Your post it seems he did lot of bodyweight workouts). Could it be concidered as 50/50 bodyweight fitness/expanders what he did or he did surprisingly more bodyweight excercises and expander workouts were supplement to them?

Did he also do some excercises that target lover body (lover back, legs in particular)? If so, what excercises?

Yeah, as You wrote - lot of bodyweightfitness guys today use basic bodyweight fitness and have great results from it (I think they use term "oldschool calisthenics" in describing what they do to separate it from street workout feats like twisting and rotating on a bar etc... personaly I also like that basic bodyweight fitness more - or all-around basic fitness approach). I know lot of bodyweight fitness guys also use rings as main equip for working out. It´s like the quote "history repeats itself" - which also could easily aply for working out and fitness (as You also mentioned - Your father did something, that could be now concidered as "weighted calisthenics", which some atheles do now).
Same thing goes within bodybuilding and another strength sports I think (lot of bodybuilders go back to basic pre-golden era workouts and stick to heavy weights more than to machines, kettlebells are strongly marketed and reccomended by many, etc..). In some ways, it´s same with expanders (fitness shops will always sell many forms of strands and resistance bands).
 

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#12 [url]

Dec 27 15 2:09 AM

BigBruv: Thanks for suggestion.
Good idea in video.

I know nothing can beat deadlifts and squats for lover body workout.
I was interested mainly with reason if expander only excercises for legs (and lover back) could replace benefits of bodyweight excercises (or combination of bodyweight fitness and expander work) for legs in long term goal (muscle building, joint health, mobility). So far It seems that expanders are inferior with working out this parts of body (with exception of expander deadlifts for lover back) to bodyweight workout (mainly for limited resistance options and short range of motion).

If You assume I´m searching for new ideas from my last question for Brad (about how his father work out legs and lover back):
Nah, I´m only interested about information of famous strandpulling person .

Last Edited By: Lemmy01 Dec 27 15 2:23 AM. Edited 1 time.

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#13 [url]

Dec 29 15 4:07 AM

my take

No, he was primarily a strand puller, about as exclusive as they came for that era of general training. Almost everyone back then did a wide variety of forms of exercise; or, as they trained over the years, they morphed from one thing to another for a time.


But, strands are not conducive to demonstrating strength: an onlooker can't really tell how impressive it is to back press a thick strand, so he did the "other" things to show off skills and power. No doubt, the doing of them added a bit of dimension to his strength and physique.

As I recall, the one hand chinning was just a goal he had very early on as it was a very selective group who could do them. Few heavyweights were capable. I don't think any other heavyweight could chin holding a 50 lbs. dumbbell in the off hand. 

The handstand pressing was that same way. He was a friend and correspondent of a world record holding handstand performer who went on to write the S&H article about my father in 1939. He just wanted to set a handstand pressing record as a heavyweight. Big men are not noted as great handstand operators, usually more in the realm of the smaller gymnasts. 

We all need to find these training motivations to keep progressing.

I did the same thing growing up as I guess I was taught that way. I was interested in judo and wrestling, then discus throwing, I did Olympic lifting, power lifting, sometimes just worked on my general appearance, lifted in odd lift meets, etc.

All were fun and productive, none more fun to me and none feel as good as a really good strand workout! But, I still like variety.

Brad

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#14 [url]

Jan 1 16 11:55 AM

Brad:

Oh, thank You for information. I appriciate that and I´m glad for this - it´s true inspiration for me that strands could work that well (with good diet, routine, etc...).
Wow, one hand chin up with pretty heavy dumbbell in other hand - that´s serious strenght.

Could You please add last information about Your father (I hope that information helpful for others, who are interested in any information about strandpullers):

"Did he also do some excercises that target lover body (lover back, legs in particular)? If so, what excercises?"
​... and if so, how ofter?

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#15 [url]

Jan 3 16 12:27 AM

leg work

Yes, he was able to do very modest leg work and it mentions this in the old S&H article, gave his leg measurements. But, you may not know that he had polio and wore a brace on one leg for life, walked with a cane.  So, the whole reason for the strands was an attempt to find exercises that didn't put pressure on his spine . . . or legs.


He "would" have had very strong legs, I think,. My Uncle Harry had really well developed legs, I squatted over 500 lbs. for 5 reps Olympic style (deep and narrow stance) with very little training, my brother Randy is still standing up out of squat cleans with as much as 240 lbs. at age 61, and my son squatted just under 600 lbs. in high school.  So, he had the genetics for strong legs.

I'll pass along what I know and that is legs respond to work but, like a deadlift, it doesn't have to be done all that often. I think one really heavy leg day per week or even 10 days is enough. the other days should be light or medium for range and working out soreness. Overworking legs and lower back is a sure way to slow down your progress.

With bands? Sure, the really heavy ones work great. There used to be an old video showing how a boxer used them for conditioning work. He slung them over his shoulders on each side, anchored to a base, then grabbed a pole in front of him as I recall and then jammed out a lot of reps. With bands, the resistance, of course, piles on at the end of the stroke, so much easier than a barbell squat where I'd say about 50% or more of squatters sort of work around suffering knee joints. Band squats feel more like plyometric quarter squats.

I'd do a really hard workout every 10 days, likely pattern in 2 more light days intended to work range, maintain tone and make these reps very fast.

Brad

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#16 [url]

Jan 3 16 8:30 PM

Thank You for that personal information.
I know that Your father had some medical issue that lead him to work out mainly with strands, didn´t know what specific issue was that.
Am I correct it properly if I imagine as "modest" leg work some slow squats and expander leg excercises with strands?

And for lover back work: If I understand Your post correctly, I´m assuming he had worked his lover back from another excercises with heavy resistance expander as additional involved muscles (and abs too - term that is using frequently for this is i think "WTF effect": like for example You work out ODP for lats, upper back and some triceps, but it can in same time have effect on abs), is that right?
(I know in general there are excercises for legs and lover back, my question was however targeted specific for Your father´s workout - I was currious for that information because from photos of him I saw it seemed to my that he could have well developed lover back too which leads me to question if that is from some exclusive strand excercise or he didn´t use for lover back specific excercise and had it developed from several expander excercises).

It interesting, that strands strenghten muscles around spine (I did some research for my posture problems - and at least recommendation of one excercise with strands/bands was mentioned nearly in every article of general fitness oriented sites) and at same time they don´t put spine to much stress (that´s huge advantage of them).

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#17 [url]

Jan 7 16 7:48 AM

Polio

Well, it wiped out his legs though he was very lucky . . . thousands of people ended up in iron lungs unable to breath on their own. And, it could have affected his spine. But, as it was, he was able to do all upper body work and it had the effect of stimulating his body. But, his legs were frail, one really bad.  If this photo pops up, this is my father sitting at the side of a swimming hole in 1945. If you look very closely, you can see his bad leg is very thin at the knee.


So, he specialized, worked what he could. 

Brad


image">Photo

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#18 [url]

Jan 7 16 2:25 PM

Yeah, it´s really motivational what he achieved from his workout (if I put aside medical condition, his development from expander and some bodyweight stuff is really great).

One question which remains unquestioned is if he did some specific excercise for lover back muscles or have them worked from another excercises (like ODP, rows, chin ups and so on)?

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#19 [url]

Jan 8 16 12:05 AM

lower back

Well, in other "back" photos taken years earlier, he had developed pretty good spinal erectors.  They were pretty thick for someone who didn't squat or deadlift where you'd expect to see good lower back development. But, he was naturally mesomorphic and you often see kids and young men with good muscle mass who have never trained much. My guess is the torso work helped him "all over."


I think most folks know that lots of strand work cause the one exercising to tense up the whole midsection and the best strandpullers often had very well developed midsections. Old photos of some of the strandpullers showed good lower back definition, Fred Rollon's famous photo comes to mind, so all of the overhead pulldowns, etc.,  were building some muscle down there, keeping waists very trim. By midsection, I am defining that as the abdominal area and the lower back.

Anyway, this old photo was 1945 and the strands were primarily developing his torso muscles. This was about his top "defined" muscular size and shape, at around 215 lbs., though he got bigger and heavier as he got older. . . like most of us do where we get thicker in girth, perhaps less defined.

You can maintain the definition by different work-outs and diet, like Fred has demonstrated, but unless most of us make a concerted effort, we get heavier for several decades after our prime years.

I'd just do lots of strand deadlifts, hyperextensions and band squats, this, if you desire to stay with strands only.

Brad


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#20 [url]

Jan 8 16 3:08 PM

So it is really possible to strengthen lover back (and whole torso) only by strand (and some bodyweight fitness) excercises which aren´t designed (or not come as first at mind) as specifically lover back/abs excercises. From informations You gave me: i think Your fathers physique was proof of that. In current time maybe Fred (Crivello) physique is proof of that. I don´t saw photo of lover back muscles of any other person who claim to do work out only with strands (+ bodyweight fitness), so I don´t have any other comparison, but I make that statement.
I know genetics is a huge part of body composition/muscle mass limits. But surely Fred (Crivello) has another genetic limitations/bonuses. If I could use somamotype example*** I would say F. Crivello have more ectomorph look (I know lot of it is diet).

***
(I don´t believe one could be easily fitted in one somamotype because that´s too general and personaly I don´t fit well in any of them = one thing is body composition, but muscle grow, reaction to specific diets, reaction to specific workout etd...)

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Fred Rollon:
Yeah, I´m familiar with Fred (Rollon) back pose photo (it´s funny how everyone I know who saw this photo had first expression: "wow" -  his back muscles was just superb).
I wonder what he did for that all-around develompment of his back: from photo it seems he had as well defined lover back, as upper body muscles, which are primarely targeted by expanders. 
My explanation for this is that he used expander with relly heavy resistance (as far Fatman´s book states), did lot of work with them not only with training, but also as main part of his strongman routine. And I thing main motion with that strongman feats with expander was Front chest pull and Back press (excercises that are visually attractive for audience and targets in some ways lover back too).
I don´t know if classic deadlift excercise as we know it was estabilished in his time (I guess lifts like Clean, Snatch or Bentpress was bigger in strongman workout then), but I suppose he did ocasionally worked his lover back by another strength feats of his routine or by competing with another strongmans (bending feats require all-around strength, bodyweight stuff too and lifting heavy things from ground/carrying stuff is clearly lot of lover body work). And genetics (as You state about Your father).
I don´t know if he did another lover back-targeted expander excercise (like expander deadlift), but I think that type of excercise wasn´t performed by many pullers then (maybe I´m wrong).

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Thank You very much for that kind of informations.
It´s very supportive not only for my workout, but as a fan of strength sports in general.

Yes, I want to stay focused mailny for expander workouts and do some bodyweight fitness as addition to that (bodyweight squats, bridges, push ups and ocasionally chin ups/pull ups and dips and some ab work). I had worked with many sorts of fitness equipment, but strands are so far most enjoyable for me (and had another advantages for me which I stated in my another posts).


I would concider buying longer band which could provide me better option to do deadlift-type excercise and squats with resistance - though I´m inspired in current days for leg workouts by Henry Lenz (wrestler) who did allegedly only high repetition bodyweight excercises for his leg muscles (and had great, healthy legs). I found out that classic bodyweight squats that I do now almost daily could do wonders for me (ears ago I did powerlifting workouts with heavy back squats, I have same "pump" and "feel" from few sets of bodyweight squats and calf raises from my previous only bodyweight leg workouts now ).


My last questions about Your father (I know I´m really curious ):
Did he use any proper diet (or more like something that could be concidered as healthy-fitness diet)?
Was expanders easyobtainable and cheap equipment in his prime or only few manufacturers sold expanders and expanders were expensive stuff?
 

Last Edited By: Lemmy01 Jan 8 16 3:19 PM. Edited 2 times.

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