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#21 [url]

May 11 12 12:15 AM

Re

Nice little piece of equipment. But It works in a limited way. Your wrist is stuck in same flex position with no side pressure on elbow. If any of you ever grip against a pro Armwrestler you will feel an out of this world power in his wrist. Your wrist works many ways; Pronation, supination, curl. Add flex and extension positions to it you have just about all movement for wrist. As a AWer I have to train my wrist in all of those positions. Plus the fact that during a match the side pressure on your inner elbow is the reason why some of them break their arm. So I have to train my wrist while there's side pressure on my inner elbow. They say it take only 15 lbs to break the untrained humus bone in upper arm. Some Pro AWers can exert over 180 lbs of side pressure violently. If you want to lift a lot of weight over your head train like an Olympian lifter. If your want to bench a lot train like a power lifter. If you  want your forearm to become strongest train like an Pro AWer. Below is a pic of the very best pro AWer on the planet right now at 175lbs division. He has one the biggest and most powerful forearm in the whole wide world. His name is Zoloev (from Russia.) It is at least 16 inches, for someone who is 175lbs that's ridiculous. It 's hard to find even a super heavy weight guy in the world who can beat him in a hook style match 


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#24 [url]

May 11 12 4:40 AM

Re

Rock climber has amazing finger strength to support hanging for extended period. I don't think AWer can equal that, no body. But for forearm power and wrist/hand , there's no other athlete  can come close to a pro AWer. A 6'4" 275 lbs a top Awer can do the flag on the pole and 1 arm chin easily. His name is Alexey Voevoda


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXtW81kFe5g&feature=related              Skip to 2:25 you will see the man, he's now a Olympic bobsleder for Russia with silver medal in Vancouver

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7aHiV8Kpwo  See how thick Cyplenkov's fingers are, he's the Hulk really. And also you'll see Alexey Voevoda (retired from AW)  compare to him in person. Remember Alexey is 6'4". Arsen in above pic can also do 1 arm chin at 220lbs, currently strongest Awer on the planet at 220lbs IMO

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#26 [url]

Oct 10 12 11:01 PM

Grip

Closing a number 3 gripper is a fine goal to aim for and a tremendous feat if that is your ambition. Discover the way to position the gripper in your hand prior to attempting a close (plenty of advice on you tube) as this makes all the difference.

For actual improvement in grip strength the grippers are so specialised that I believe there is very little carry over to other activities (even having a strong handshake would you believe). Just my opinion but pinch gripping will give you a better overall increase in grip strength. 

If you just want to develop the forearm then follow the Inch advice and concentrate on the wrist movements during each strand pulling exercise kills two birds with one stone.

 

Last Edited By: BigBruvOfEngIandUK Oct 8 13 4:09 PM. Edited 2 times.

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#28 [url]

Oct 11 12 11:40 PM

Re: Grip

kamp91 the return wrote:
i too believe that grippers develop a too specific kind of hand strength

I'm only interested in hand strength as it pertains to deadlifting. Over the years I have read several good deadlifters comment on direct grip work and most agree it's a waste of time and develops a very specific sort of hand strength. Makes sense, as very few deadlifts are lost due to grip weakness. So by training with grippers you get good at squeezing grippers, not much else.

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#29 [url]

Oct 12 12 7:00 PM

Re: Grip

yea there is not too much transfer between grippers and other type of exercises in which hand strength is required...for deadlifting i think that hanging from a chinup bar (even with just one hand at a time) should be pretty useful:all in all you are training the muscles of your hand isometrically,like during a deadlift

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#30 [url]

Oct 13 12 8:18 AM

Re: Grip

I remember when I started training on my rings that my grip strength went up quite a bit and that involved a lot of hanging from the hands. After a few months of that I used to tear up phone books fairly easily which I couldn't do before ring training.

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#32 [url]

Oct 15 12 3:37 AM

Re: Grip

I think the Ivank supergripper type design is superior to the inverted-v design for general grip strength; I think the reason a lot of grip guys dislike the ivanko is because it doesn't carry over well to inverted-v style gripping, which is mostly what they're interested in.

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#33 [url]

Oct 15 12 8:50 PM

Re: Grip

Though it seems like some of the new Ivanko copycat designs are somehow more acceptable in that group.

Honestly the Ivanko's build quality looks to still be the best, but that having only seen jpegs. I've been looking at various grip tools, this might be a good option, thanks for brining it up Dave.

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#34 [url]

Oct 15 12 11:13 PM

Re: Grip

Mr Brady

The Ivanko grip trainer seems a better option if your goal is to develop the overall crushing strength of your grip as the resistance can be lowered and you can work the thumbs, which are after all half of your grip strength and are solefully neglected when using the nutcracker style grippers.

The Ivenko is not recommended by the people training to close the heavy grippers as there appears to be very little carryover of the strength developed.

Closing the heavy grippers, as that is as we have established, is a very specialised feat and only uses the thumb base as a brace for the gripper handle to push against.

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#35 [url]

Oct 16 12 1:25 AM

Re: Grip

This is good info. I was under the impression they were not in favour because they were inherently inferior. Seeing as I have no special asperations to close a particular CoC this does sound good.

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#36 [url]

Oct 16 12 6:35 PM

Re: Grip

Mr Brady

I have not personally used the ivenko gripper, as I made my own version when I trained my grip, but a contributor called fightertrainer made an interesting contribution regarding using isometrics with this tool to produce what he called his "killer handshake"

I have found the link http://strandpulling.yuku.com/reply/755/How-do-you-train-you-forearm-wrist-hand#reply-755 which has some thought provoking ideas on grip training that you should enjoy.

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#38 [url]

Oct 19 12 8:06 PM

Re: Grip

The Super Gripper just arrived.

For my purposes this is a much better solution than the CoCs I own.

The gripper it self seems to be well made, but there is some excess mould flash where the fingers go, it wasn't ground off properly. I'll take a file to it and that should solve the problem.

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#40 [url]

Oct 19 12 11:14 PM

Re: Grip

Kamp it's a very inexpensive toy. I do plenty of bar work, but having recently had elbow surgery, something that let's me specifically work my grip is very useful.

Most bar work, finger tips pushups is fairly static, I want something that allows my fingers to go through a full range of motion as well as the ability to adjust the load. Both are good, I do both.

Now if you start to add bar swings to that, I'm sure you can really develop an iron grip. Right now my grip is such crap that I can only manage a hand full of good swings with out straps and gloves.

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